clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

BCS Bowl Bids: How College Football Teams Lose Money In The Current System

New, 2 comments

With two Pac-10 teams in the top six of the latest BCS standings, the conference might be looking at a rare case of having two teams in BCS bowls. In the 12-year history of the BCS, the Pac-10 has had two teams reach BCS bowl games just two times, in 2000 and 2002. Aside from the prestige of making a BCS bowl game, just what does that mean for the schools in question?

↵

Not much, according to Sports Illustrated. In this week's issue, Austin Murphy and Dan Wetzel wrote an article entitled "Playoff: How (and Why) the BCS is Blocking What College football Needs," outlining the exorbitant expenses of the current bowl system. Even the Rose Bowl game isn't necessarily a windfall:

↵
↵

The $18.5 million [Ohio State received for making the Rose Bowl last January] went to the Big Ten, where it was added to a pool of bowl revenue that was then sliced into 12 shares - one for each team, one for the league office. That still left Ohio State with a tidy $2.2 million to spend, which the Buckeyes did. Ohio State's team travel costs were $352,727. Unsold tickets ran the school a cool $144,710. The bill to transport, feed and lodge the band and cheerleaders came to $366,814. Throw in entertainment, gifts and sundry other expenses and the Buckeyes lost $79,597.

↵
↵

Losing money by making the Rose Bowl? That doesn't seem right. Then again, those "other expenses" work out to over $1.4 million, so maybe Ohio State should stop buying designer Buckeye stickers at Macy's.